Ukulele Video Lessons - Bar Chord Lesson

By watching this ukulele video lessons, I'll be teaching you the bar chord scales. Many songs incorporate these types of chords, and if you want to be a well-rounded player, then you will need to learn how to do them properly. In this lesson, we will go over the major chords, beginning with “A” and going through “G”. It’s a relatively simple technique, but it does take some time to learn how to do it properly. Don’t worry; with practice, you will be able to get it down without too much trouble at all. It is the same technique. You are simply moving the same chord up and down the fretboard.


Watch This Ukulele Video Lessons On Bar Chord Scales


Picking is Fun and Easy

Something else you will find when you play the bar chord scales is that it can add a new dimension to your style of picking, and it helps to make the sound fuller. You can also utilize hammer-on and pull-off techniques, which give the chords even more personality and style. Using these techniques sounds great and shows that you really know your stuff!


  • Major Bar Chord: “A”

To play this bar chord, you will move down to the ninth fret and use your forefinger to cover, or bar, all four of the strings. Use your ring finger on the twelfth fret to hold down the A string. You can strum this and have your bar chord. To pluck the scale, you will pluck the A string at the twelfth fret, move your ring finger up to the eleventh fret and pluck the string, and then lift your finger and pluck the A string, still barring the ninth fret. Then, you will pluck the E string on the twelfth fret, then pluck on the tenth fret, and then open on the E string. Then, on the C string on the eleventh fret and C on the ninth fret.

You can also reverse this process to move backwards through the scale.

One of the great things about doing the scales is the fact that the patterns are going to be the same as you move around the fretboard. When you move to another chords, you will play the bar chord scales in the same pattern.


  • Major Bar Chord: “B”

With this scale, you will start with your bar on the eleventh fret and follow the same picking pattern.


  • Major Bar Chord: “C”

To play this bar chord, you will bar the twelfth fret. You will then follow the same pattern as the A scale, with your ring finger first hitting the fifteenth fret and plucking the A string, then moving up to the fourteenth fret. Just transpose the location, but keep the distance and the pattern the exact same as with your A scale.


  • Major Bar Chord: “D”

Bar the second fret and follow the same picking pattern as the others.


  • Major Bar Chord: “E”

Here, you will bar the fourth fret and follow the picking pattern.


  • Major Bar Chord: “F”

Bar the fifth fret with your forefinger and then follow the same picking pattern.


  • Major Bar Chord: “G”

Keep the picking pattern the same as you bar the sixth fret with your forefinger.

There you have it. Once you learn the picking pattern and the right frets to bar, you can see just how easy it is to play the bar chord scales.

Of course, you do need to keep practicing if you hope to become adept at the scales and learn how to use them with playing actual songs. It’s fun to challenge yourself and to practice the scales though, so make sure you train daily until you can do it without thinking! Just keep on watching the ukulele video lessons until you get a hang of it!

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